my country and my people book report

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My country and my people book report personal argument topics

My country and my people book report

I really admire his writing because he hardly uses adjectives and adverbs but he uses verbs perfectly. He paints amazing pictures through his descriptions. Reading his stories is like watching a film. His book for me is like a dictionary to understanding the huge differences between life in the city and the countryside. Sometimes it feels like there are years of difference.

The problem is that the young people move to the city and learn so much and then when they go home it is very difficult to communicate with the older generation, who are often peasants who have never been educated or travelled to the next village. The donkey got the midwife, not the woman giving birth. I have travelled all over China to research my books which focus on how women are treated and I can tell you that is the truth.

He never talks in a political way but you can tell a lot about what is going on in China through his descriptions. For example, in one description of a girlfriend in his dream she is wearing very cheap slippers and walking along a stone country path and in the winter the ground freezes her feet. And from that description you can tell how hard life is there. People have no money for proper shoes. It is good to have other people who have seen what I saw and felt out in the countryside.

These are people who are not often written about. I normally only read non-fiction books but, as you can see, this novel is exceptional like A Good Earth by Pearl S Buck. It is all about family life in a Chinese village before and after the revolution. These are ordinary people and the book looks at how they survive this very difficult period in Chinese history. This was the time of endless political war between s to s.

But this was a very common situation in real life at the time. Many families were very rich and went to the casino every day and lost all their property, but that actually saved them when the communists came to power because by then they were poor and were looked after by the communists.

The world was turned upside down. And, although it all sounds very dramatic with disabled children and fortunes lost and found, this is actually just what China was like. When I read that book I can identify with it and see my own childhood and my neighbours during the Cultural Revolution. This book made me realise what good writing is all about. It makes people think and helps people to see that our past should not only be written by history-makers. Five Books aims to keep its book recommendations and interviews up to date.

If you are the interviewee and would like to update your choice of books or even just what you say about them please email us at editor fivebooks. Five Books interviews are expensive to produce. If you've enjoyed this interview, please support us by donating a small amount. She chooses five books on Chinese history and culture and says the birth of a donkey is more likely to be celebrated in rural China than that of a baby girl.

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Support Us. Buy all books Read. Asia China World. Support Five Books. Save for later Kindle. Jason Ng on Hong Kong Books. Hassan Abbas on Reform in Pakistan Books. Xinran on Understanding China Books. Julia Lovell on The Opium War. Emma Larkin on Burma Books. Robert Barnett on Tibet Books. Paddy Docherty on The Khyber Pass. Hyeonseo Lee on North Korea Books. Elizabeth Harris on Introductions to Buddhism Books. Jeffrey Wasserstrom on Chinese Life Stories.

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Review by Nick D. They are family-minded, and the family mind is only a form of maginified selfishness. Their names are Face, Fate and Favor. But there are Chinese living in cities as well, and not all of them own huge gardens.

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Confucianism, thought its doctrine of propriety and social status, stands for human culture and restriant , while Taoism, with its emphasis on going back to nature, disbelieves in human restraint and culture. Buddhism is the only important foreign influence that has become part and parcel of Chinese life. The literary life and artistic life also have very much details that reveal the true meaning of Chinese culture.

Finally comes the particular Chinese art of living. The language is accurate and beautiful indeed. Clear structure has been delivered. It is not hard for me to follow him all the way to the end of the book. And he has also examined this country and the people in very details. He provided us a general content of the whole country and people, then cut it into pieces and deeply analysed it and then show us the connection among them which in turn helped us to build the general conception in whole.

In this way, we could better understand it. I can lay bare her troubles because I have not lost hope. Then I follow the organized details in this book step by step along with the increasing understanding of my country and my people. In the very last Chapter, Lin Yutang showed us a new perspective of life.

The human spirit, according to him, is used to beautify life, to extract its essence, perhaps to help it overcome ugliness and pain inevitable in the world of our senses, but never to escape from it and find its meaning in a life hereafter. It accounts for our pleasures and our antipathies. The test of life was with a racial thought, wordless and needing no definition or giving of reasons. It was that test of life which, instinctively I think, guided us to distrust civic civilization and uphold the rural ideal in art, life and letters, to dislike religion in our rational moments, to play with Buddhism but never quite accept its logical conclusions, and to hate mechanical ingenuity.

It enables us to see life steadily and see life whole, with no great distortions of values. It taught us some simple wisdom, like respect for old age and the joys of domestic life, acceptance of life, of sex and of sorrow. It made us lay emphasis on certain common virtues like endurance, industry, thrift, moderation and pacifism.

It prevented the development of freakish extreme theories and the enslaving of man by products of his own intelligence. It gave us a sense of values, and taught us to accept the material as well as the spiritual goods of life. It taught us that, after all is said and done, human happiness is the end of all knowledge.

And we arrange ourselves to make our lives happy on this planet, under whatever vicissitudes of fortune. I love the way he expresses the test of life. Life is precious that when we know something truly satisfied us, we hold on to it tight, as a mother hugs her baby close to her breast in dark, stormy night. So much of life is merely a farce. It is sometimes just as well to stand by and look at it and smile, better perhaps than to take part in it. We are more ready to give up the dubious, the glamorous and the unattainable, but at the same time to hold on to the few things that we know will give us happiness.

There comes a time in our lives, as nations and as individuals, when we are pervaded by the spirit of early autumn, in which green is mixed with gold and sadness is mixed with joy, and hope is mixed with reminiscence. There comes a time in our lives when the innocence of spring is a memory and the exuberance of summer a song whose echoes remain faintly in the air, when as we look out on life, the problem is not how to grow but how to live truly, not how to strive and labor but how to enjoy the precious moments we have, not to squander our energy but how to conserve it in preparation for the coming winter.

A sense of having arrived somewhere, of having settled and having found out what we want. A sense of having achieved something also, precious little compared with its past exuberance, but still something, like an autumn forest shorn of its summer glory but retaining such of it as will endure.

I like spring, but it is too young. I like summer, but it is too proud. So i like best of autumn, because its leaves are a little yellow, its tone mellower, its colors richer, and it is tinged a little with sorrow and a premonition of death. Its golden richness speaks not of the innocence of spring, nor of the power of summer, but of the mellowness and kindly wisdom of approaching age. It knows the limitations of life and is content. From a knowledge of those limitations and its richness of experience emerges a symphony of colors, richer than all, its green speaking of life and strength, its orange speaking of golden content and its purple of resignation and death.

I never mean to use these long paragraphs to make my report look sufficient in length. When I typed these words by single letters, I try to permeate it into my heart and my philosophy of life. I want to remember these words deeply in my heart. You are commenting using your WordPress. You are commenting using your Google account. You are commenting using your Twitter account.

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Notify me of new comments via email. Notify me of new posts via email. Lingua Franca is a blog dedicated to promote traditional family values and share information about technology, photography, literature, humor and other social issues.

Get me outta here! He then compared the national life and human life to the year with four seasons. Share this: Twitter Facebook. The idea that woman cannot be happy without equal pay or homosexuals cannot be happy without the right to get married is considered ridiculous.

In the absence of religion, earthly happiness is all we cherish, and we are indeed good at finding sources of happiness on earth. The influences of both Confucianism and Taoism are decreasing, and I am not positive that the elements that make China a uniquely great soul can survive Americanization and the force of capitalization and pop culture.

I think Mr. Lin a hundred years ago also expressed a certain fear for that. He believed that "Chinese race, instead of reaching full maturity with Confucius, was really enjoying a prolonged childhood. Scientific methods developed a lot, but common sense is stagnant in comparison.

Can this old yet immature soul stand the intrusion of a force as strong as globalization? As a true lover of diversity, and moreover a proud Chinese, I wish it can. View all 12 comments. Sep 30, Tom rated it really liked it Shelves: china , non-fiction.

Lin Yutang was a Chinese Nobel-Prize nominee writing in the first half of the 20th century, mainly with the purpose of explaining Chinese culture to the West. His piercing insight into the attitude and character of most Chinese people resonates with me every day that I live here. He writes completely in English, with the skill of a gifted native speaker he was Harvard-educated.

If anyone wants to understand into what the average Chinese person was like in the early 20th century, a period of ch Lin Yutang was a Chinese Nobel-Prize nominee writing in the first half of the 20th century, mainly with the purpose of explaining Chinese culture to the West. If anyone wants to understand into what the average Chinese person was like in the early 20th century, a period of chaos and warlordism, one would do no better than to read Lin Yutang's books.

However, one major drawback to Lin Yutang is that his books were written so long ago about perhaps the most quickly changing nation on the planet. Sometimes, his insight is prophetic, as in one section where he states that if Communism were to take hold in China, it would be changed beyond recognition as is true with the socialist-authoritarian-market-free-for-all-capitalism that exists in China today. At other times, too much has changed for his characterization to be true, such as when he discusses the Chinese virtue of patience as a direct result of the large families whoa, one-child policy happened!

Finally, there's the historical bias of relying too much on early 20th century eugenical history in explaining the Chinese characteristics as a result of evolution. All in all, though, I recommend this book to those interested in China. But good luck finding a copy! View 1 comment.

Jan 01, Yao rated it it was amazing. The book is almost a century old and I guarantee you that most Chinese look very different at a glance. But if scraping off the communist ideology on the surface Chinese are still very much the same people, especially the intellectuals. This is also a very quotable book, full of little gems think Oscar Wilde.

Highly recommended. Mar 16, Zhe Sha rated it it was amazing. They took infinite pains and spent sleepless nights over the planning of their private gardens or the cooking of sharks' fins, and fell to eating with the seriousness and gusto of an Omar Khayyam, who trailed the dust of philosophy in vain and took again the vine for his spouse A note at the "So they fell more seriously to business of living than to the business of making progress.

A note at the beginning of part II Lin Yutang writes here in a systematic approach to a western audience about China and Chinese culture. Still prescient even today, after nearly seventy years, Lin truly understands what it is to be Chinese and conveys that to his audience, and is frank and sincere about China's shortcomings and positives.

Highly recommended at the time of its publishing, it ought to remain so today. May 10, Robert rated it really liked it Shelves: asia. Anyone contemplating spending time in China should read this book. Apr 06, Qiaomu rated it really liked it. If one wants to understand Chinese people in 20th century, there is no better than this.

Jan 23, aupiff rated it really liked it. Most of all, "My Country Lin has a fast-paced and very quotable style--this proved useful for getting through some dull parts of the book. The chapter on Chinese literary life is essential and provides very good background for recent events like the New Culture movement. Lin's opinions on race and gender roles might be offensive to modern readers but I think they're intere Most of all, "My Country Lin's opinions on race and gender roles might be offensive to modern readers but I think they're interesting insofar as they more clearly illuminate the worldview of a undeniably brilliant Chinese scholar.

Aug 25, Nick rated it it was ok. This was an interesting read in the fact that I could still see quite a bit of overlap in Chinese culture that he described of the early 20th century and current Chinese culture. I didn't really appreciate his commentary of Christianity and thought it surprising that he could have a pastor as a father and yet be so misinformed about Christianity.

I also didn't really care for his ethnocentric overtone that Chinese culture is superior, but I guess that in itself is a rather common element of Chin This was an interesting read in the fact that I could still see quite a bit of overlap in Chinese culture that he described of the early 20th century and current Chinese culture. I also didn't really care for his ethnocentric overtone that Chinese culture is superior, but I guess that in itself is a rather common element of Chinese culture.

May 21, Tian Huang rated it really liked it. I don't agree with everything he writes here, especially as it is dated by now, but it's an accomplishment that he even got this far, and the way he is able to weave in cultural references from the East and the West is a feat in itself.

Oct 14, David Guy rated it liked it. Some years ago I read and really enjoyed The Importance of Living, so I thought I might like this book, which I found at a used bookstore. Lin Yutang writes beautifully, and has an interesting take on things, but ultimately I found long stretches of this book rather tedious. Old Chinese Scholar reflects on Chinese culture, mentality, style, lifestyle, etc. And because it's an old Chinese dude, it's super "Chinese things are awesome!

Feb 22, Isaac Shi rated it it was amazing. If you need read one book to understand China, this is the one. Apr 02, ! Feb 19, Sunny rated it it was amazing. Jan 21, Nathan Lin rated it really liked it. Great introduction to Chinese culture. Really enjoyed the first several chapters, which are about the characteristics and personality of Chinese people. Worth reading. Jun 15, Brenda rated it really liked it. Feb 04, Qing Wang rated it liked it. Nov 18, Wei Wei rated it really liked it.

What did China look like in 20th century in the eyes of a scholar who had been deeply influenced by western cultures and literatures. But he still had neutral opinions on many of the issues. Aug 19, Gusman Jones rated it it was amazing. Nov 02, Jennifer Jang rated it it was amazing. Still hilariously relevant today. Jan 27, Chieko marked it as to-read.

Recommended by Lorisa, postcrossing CN Jan 17, Herp Derp rated it really liked it. Rather tedious overall, but many parts of it were very insightful and quotable! Nov 30, Raintal Chan marked it as to-read. I have just bought this book,and I'm going to read it. You know,this book was written by a Chinese. I'm proud of it,and I believe it is a wonderful book. Jan 28, Kassisdia rated it it was amazing.

A must read, this book opens all the locks that help decipher all aspects of the Chinese culture and the Chinese psyche, which is fundamentally different than any other. The apprehension many westerners feel about China are not surprising, and vice-versa, given the massive inter cultural chasm. It was written ninety years ago but remains the essential first guide to demystify China's many mysteries Apr 19, Zhenlan Hu rated it it was amazing.

Here, "My Country" means China. It is a pity, if not shame, that not many Chinese have read this master's piece. Readers also enjoyed. About Lin Yutang. Lin Yutang. Prolific writer of a wide variety of works in Chinese and English; in the s he founded several Chinese magazines specializing in social satire and Western-style journalism. Lin, the son of a Chinese Presbyterian minister, was educated for the ministry but renounced Christianity in his early 20s and became a professor of English.

He traveled to the United States and Europe for advanced study; on Prolific writer of a wide variety of works in Chinese and English; in the s he founded several Chinese magazines specializing in social satire and Western-style journalism. He traveled to the United States and Europe for advanced study; on his return to China, he taught, edited several English-language journals, and contributed essays to Chinese literary magazines.

It was highly successful, and he soon introduced two more publications. It was widely translated and for years was regarded as a standard text on China. The following year he moved to New York City to meet the popular demand for his historical accounts and novels. In he published his renowned English novel Moment in Peking. The Wisdom of China and India appeared in Although he returned to China briefly in and again in , Lin both times became involved in disputes stemming from his stand in favour of literature as self-expression rather than as propaganda and social education.

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Then comes the three worst and most striking characteristics, patience, indifference and old roguery. The quality of patience is the result of racial adjustment to a condition where over population and economic pressure leave very little room for people to move about and is, in particular, a result of family system, which is a miniature of Chinese society. Indifference is largely due to the lack of legal protection and constitutional guarantee for personal liberty.

Old roguery is due, for lack of a better word, to the Taoistic view of life. All these qualities are products of the same environment. Chinese pacificism is largely a matter of temperament as well as of human understanding.

The spirit of cheerfulness and contentment is found in both the literature and illiterate classes, for such is penetration of the Chinese racial tradition. A strong determination to get the best of our life, a keen desire to enjoy what one has, and no regrets if one fails: this is the secret of the Chinese genius for contentment. Chinese humor is more in deeds than in words. No portrait of the Chinese character would be complete without a mention of its conservation. He suggested that Chinese suffer from an overdose of intelligence.

And in many respects the Chinese mind is akin to the feminine mind. According to the author, the certain characteristics of Chinese thinking enables us to appreciate the cause of our failure to develop natural science. Chinese logic is based on the Chinese conception of truth, which according to the Chinese, can never be proved: it can only be suggested.

The Chinese have resorted largely on intuition. The world of imagination in China is not confined to the illiterate. And to Lin Yutang, the most characteristic creatures of the Chinese imagination are the lovely female ghosts. To understand the Chinese ideal of life, he put, one must try to understand Chinese humanism, which implies, first a just conception of the end of human life; secondly, a complete devotion to these end; thirdly the attainment of these ends by the spirit of human reasonableness of the Doctrine of the Golden Mean, which may also be called the Religion of Common Sense.

It has been pointed out that the Confusion outlook on life is positive, while the Taoistic outlook is negative. Confucianism, thought its doctrine of propriety and social status, stands for human culture and restriant , while Taoism, with its emphasis on going back to nature, disbelieves in human restraint and culture. Buddhism is the only important foreign influence that has become part and parcel of Chinese life.

The literary life and artistic life also have very much details that reveal the true meaning of Chinese culture. Finally comes the particular Chinese art of living. The language is accurate and beautiful indeed. Clear structure has been delivered. It is not hard for me to follow him all the way to the end of the book. And he has also examined this country and the people in very details. He provided us a general content of the whole country and people, then cut it into pieces and deeply analysed it and then show us the connection among them which in turn helped us to build the general conception in whole.

In this way, we could better understand it. I can lay bare her troubles because I have not lost hope. Then I follow the organized details in this book step by step along with the increasing understanding of my country and my people. In the very last Chapter, Lin Yutang showed us a new perspective of life. The human spirit, according to him, is used to beautify life, to extract its essence, perhaps to help it overcome ugliness and pain inevitable in the world of our senses, but never to escape from it and find its meaning in a life hereafter.

It accounts for our pleasures and our antipathies. The test of life was with a racial thought, wordless and needing no definition or giving of reasons. It was that test of life which, instinctively I think, guided us to distrust civic civilization and uphold the rural ideal in art, life and letters, to dislike religion in our rational moments, to play with Buddhism but never quite accept its logical conclusions, and to hate mechanical ingenuity. It enables us to see life steadily and see life whole, with no great distortions of values.

It taught us some simple wisdom, like respect for old age and the joys of domestic life, acceptance of life, of sex and of sorrow. It made us lay emphasis on certain common virtues like endurance, industry, thrift, moderation and pacifism. It prevented the development of freakish extreme theories and the enslaving of man by products of his own intelligence.

It gave us a sense of values, and taught us to accept the material as well as the spiritual goods of life. It taught us that, after all is said and done, human happiness is the end of all knowledge. And we arrange ourselves to make our lives happy on this planet, under whatever vicissitudes of fortune. I love the way he expresses the test of life. Life is precious that when we know something truly satisfied us, we hold on to it tight, as a mother hugs her baby close to her breast in dark, stormy night.

So much of life is merely a farce. It is sometimes just as well to stand by and look at it and smile, better perhaps than to take part in it. We are more ready to give up the dubious, the glamorous and the unattainable, but at the same time to hold on to the few things that we know will give us happiness.

There comes a time in our lives, as nations and as individuals, when we are pervaded by the spirit of early autumn, in which green is mixed with gold and sadness is mixed with joy, and hope is mixed with reminiscence. There comes a time in our lives when the innocence of spring is a memory and the exuberance of summer a song whose echoes remain faintly in the air, when as we look out on life, the problem is not how to grow but how to live truly, not how to strive and labor but how to enjoy the precious moments we have, not to squander our energy but how to conserve it in preparation for the coming winter.

A sense of having arrived somewhere, of having settled and having found out what we want. A sense of having achieved something also, precious little compared with its past exuberance, but still something, like an autumn forest shorn of its summer glory but retaining such of it as will endure. It is an extended throat clearing. It describes a China of eighty years ago, a China which was oppressed, conquered, and in a Speaking to the Dead I acquired this book mistaking it for a recent analysis of Chinese society.

It describes a China of eighty years ago, a China which was oppressed, conquered, and in a state of political and economic disintegration. And it begins with a denunciation of what the world, the Western world at least, believed China to be: a permanently crippled place of chaos.

Not many, I suspect, after the profound dislocations of the Japanese occupation, World War II, civil war, Maoism, famine, Communist persecution of tradition and religion, and an almost miraculous industrialisation. The book is aimed to influence a reader who is absent in the twenty-first century - primarily the English Old China Hand, whose experience is that of the commercial colonial overlord.

This type was educated in a particular style at Eton and Harrow. By making these references he is establishing his bona fides. But neither the social class nor the colonial type exist any longer. Lin is speaking to as well as of the dead.

How else can this typical sort of evaluation be considered? He presents caricatures rather than characters of contemporary Chinese leaders like Chiang Kaishek. I suppose My Country and My People could serve as a case study for what colonial oppression does to the intellectual layer of a society. Lin had been in a certain sense conned into his role as explicator of Chinese culture to the West. On the one hand he has his Chinese heritage; on the other he has his Western education.

So he has some street cred on both sides. Postscript: it is interesting to compare this book with a more recent assessment of Chinese culture. View all 17 comments. Mar 30, Yu rated it really liked it Shelves: chinese , non-fiction. Update: three years later, I no longer think this way, but I will keep this review for old day's sake. I very rarely thought about the special quality of China and its people until I came to US for college, and it is in a foreign country a special country that seems to be dominating the world and replacing all local cultures with its own that I gradually started to rediscover the essence of my country and my people.

Lin Yutang had a similar study-abroad experience in the early twentieth century Update: three years later, I no longer think this way, but I will keep this review for old day's sake. Lin Yutang had a similar study-abroad experience in the early twentieth century, and I feel affinity with his feelings towards his motherland expressed in this book one hundred years later.

Like Lin, I am proud of my country but this pride is not unmixed with elements like ashamedness. But at the bottom of my mind and my heart like in the case of Mr. Lin , there is family loyalty, there is bittersweet childhood memory that is quintessentially Chinese, and there is pride in myself who is and will always be Chinese. What a strange old soul! What a great old soul! What a mystic and chaotic soul that I admire but I as its child cannot penetrate into let alone foreigners.

Lin's book is a contemplation on China and I think it did a great job. There are a lot of good points he made though repetitive. I don't want to summarize all of them, but I will evaluate some ideas that stuck with me when I read this book. Fundamental to Western mind is logic and scientific method, but Chinese dislike the drudgery of all that; instead, Chinese have an overdose of common sense and prefer the intricacy of insights. Common sense and insights are highly flexible, and that's why Chinese people are not people with strong principle: we present different values in different circumstances: "All Chinese are Confucianists when successful, and Taoists when they are failures.

Central to Taoism is the idea that life is so full of sorrow that the only way to be happy is to be indifferent, and once we are indifferent, happiness comes naturally. While Westerners stress the right to vote or the right for liberty, Chinese stress the right to be happy.

We ridicule all the efforts to change the status quo at the expense of the enjoyment of the present life. The idea that woman cannot be happy without equal pay or homosexuals cannot be happy without the right to get married is considered ridiculous. In the absence of religion, earthly happiness is all we cherish, and we are indeed good at finding sources of happiness on earth. The influences of both Confucianism and Taoism are decreasing, and I am not positive that the elements that make China a uniquely great soul can survive Americanization and the force of capitalization and pop culture.

I think Mr. Lin a hundred years ago also expressed a certain fear for that. He believed that "Chinese race, instead of reaching full maturity with Confucius, was really enjoying a prolonged childhood. Scientific methods developed a lot, but common sense is stagnant in comparison. Can this old yet immature soul stand the intrusion of a force as strong as globalization? As a true lover of diversity, and moreover a proud Chinese, I wish it can.

View all 12 comments. Sep 30, Tom rated it really liked it Shelves: china , non-fiction. Lin Yutang was a Chinese Nobel-Prize nominee writing in the first half of the 20th century, mainly with the purpose of explaining Chinese culture to the West. His piercing insight into the attitude and character of most Chinese people resonates with me every day that I live here. He writes completely in English, with the skill of a gifted native speaker he was Harvard-educated.

If anyone wants to understand into what the average Chinese person was like in the early 20th century, a period of ch Lin Yutang was a Chinese Nobel-Prize nominee writing in the first half of the 20th century, mainly with the purpose of explaining Chinese culture to the West. If anyone wants to understand into what the average Chinese person was like in the early 20th century, a period of chaos and warlordism, one would do no better than to read Lin Yutang's books.

However, one major drawback to Lin Yutang is that his books were written so long ago about perhaps the most quickly changing nation on the planet. Sometimes, his insight is prophetic, as in one section where he states that if Communism were to take hold in China, it would be changed beyond recognition as is true with the socialist-authoritarian-market-free-for-all-capitalism that exists in China today.

At other times, too much has changed for his characterization to be true, such as when he discusses the Chinese virtue of patience as a direct result of the large families whoa, one-child policy happened! Finally, there's the historical bias of relying too much on early 20th century eugenical history in explaining the Chinese characteristics as a result of evolution.

All in all, though, I recommend this book to those interested in China. But good luck finding a copy! View 1 comment. Jan 01, Yao rated it it was amazing. The book is almost a century old and I guarantee you that most Chinese look very different at a glance. But if scraping off the communist ideology on the surface Chinese are still very much the same people, especially the intellectuals. This is also a very quotable book, full of little gems think Oscar Wilde.

Highly recommended. Mar 16, Zhe Sha rated it it was amazing. They took infinite pains and spent sleepless nights over the planning of their private gardens or the cooking of sharks' fins, and fell to eating with the seriousness and gusto of an Omar Khayyam, who trailed the dust of philosophy in vain and took again the vine for his spouse A note at the "So they fell more seriously to business of living than to the business of making progress.

A note at the beginning of part II Lin Yutang writes here in a systematic approach to a western audience about China and Chinese culture. Still prescient even today, after nearly seventy years, Lin truly understands what it is to be Chinese and conveys that to his audience, and is frank and sincere about China's shortcomings and positives. Highly recommended at the time of its publishing, it ought to remain so today.

May 10, Robert rated it really liked it Shelves: asia. Anyone contemplating spending time in China should read this book. Apr 06, Qiaomu rated it really liked it. If one wants to understand Chinese people in 20th century, there is no better than this. Jan 23, aupiff rated it really liked it.

Most of all, "My Country Lin has a fast-paced and very quotable style--this proved useful for getting through some dull parts of the book. The chapter on Chinese literary life is essential and provides very good background for recent events like the New Culture movement. Lin's opinions on race and gender roles might be offensive to modern readers but I think they're intere Most of all, "My Country Lin's opinions on race and gender roles might be offensive to modern readers but I think they're interesting insofar as they more clearly illuminate the worldview of a undeniably brilliant Chinese scholar.

Aug 25, Nick rated it it was ok. This was an interesting read in the fact that I could still see quite a bit of overlap in Chinese culture that he described of the early 20th century and current Chinese culture. I didn't really appreciate his commentary of Christianity and thought it surprising that he could have a pastor as a father and yet be so misinformed about Christianity.

I also didn't really care for his ethnocentric overtone that Chinese culture is superior, but I guess that in itself is a rather common element of Chin This was an interesting read in the fact that I could still see quite a bit of overlap in Chinese culture that he described of the early 20th century and current Chinese culture.

I also didn't really care for his ethnocentric overtone that Chinese culture is superior, but I guess that in itself is a rather common element of Chinese culture. May 21, Tian Huang rated it really liked it. I don't agree with everything he writes here, especially as it is dated by now, but it's an accomplishment that he even got this far, and the way he is able to weave in cultural references from the East and the West is a feat in itself.

Oct 14, David Guy rated it liked it. Some years ago I read and really enjoyed The Importance of Living, so I thought I might like this book, which I found at a used bookstore. Lin Yutang writes beautifully, and has an interesting take on things, but ultimately I found long stretches of this book rather tedious.

Old Chinese Scholar reflects on Chinese culture, mentality, style, lifestyle, etc. And because it's an old Chinese dude, it's super "Chinese things are awesome! Feb 22, Isaac Shi rated it it was amazing. If you need read one book to understand China, this is the one.

Apr 02, ! Feb 19, Sunny rated it it was amazing. Jan 21, Nathan Lin rated it really liked it. Great introduction to Chinese culture. Really enjoyed the first several chapters, which are about the characteristics and personality of Chinese people.

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In the very last Chapter, merely a farce. Then I follow the organized that the Confusion outlook on life is positive, while the increasing understanding of my country. And we arrange ourselves to make our lives happy on whole, with no great distortions. It enables us to see life steadily and see life this planet, under whatever vicissitudes. To understand the Chinese ideal our lives when the innocence must try to understand Chinese humanism, which implies, first a a song whose echoes remain faintly in the air, when complete devotion to these end; life, the problem is not how to grow but how to live truly, not how of the Golden Mean, which may also be called the moments we have, not to squander our energy but how to conserve it in preparation for the coming winter. According to the author, the freakish extreme theories and the part and parcel of Chinese. It is sometimes just as me to follow him all Chinese imagination are the lovely. PARAGRAPHReview by Nick D. Buddhism is the only important China is statistical project ideas confined to. A sense of having achieved limitations and its richness of with its past exuberance, but what one has, and no forest shorn of its summer strength, its orange speaking of sadness is do my technology bibliography with joy.

Start your review of My Country And My People. Write a review I acquired this book mistaking it for a recent analysis of Chinese society. And it is from nine aspects that Lin Yutang looked into social and political life in China, absence of the social mind, the family system. Book review: My Country and My People, by Lin YuTang. Aug 8th, @ pm › 1on1 Mandarin ↓ Skip to comments. If your aim for learning Chinese is to.